michael pearce - bass-baritone

reviews

MENDELSSOHN: ELIJAH [Guildford Cathedral]

Turning to Michael Pearce’s Elijah, it is difficult to speak too highly of it. A rich bass voice which also possessed the warmth of timbre to make the more compassionate side of Elijah most telling, was exactly the right type of voice for the part. Lord God of Abraham was beautifully sung, Is not His Word was furiously penetrating and, frankly, when his final exit came, the remainder of the performance inevitably had a slight feeling of anti-climax. SURREY ADVERTISER

BRITTEN: WAR REQUIEM [Watford Town Hall]

It was the baritone Michael Pearce who moved me most deeply, his powerful, rich voice with its effortless technique conveying every sad nuance of Wilfred Owen's despairing words as if he would engrave them in our hearts. WATFORD OBSERVER

BACH: ST. JOHN PASSION [Queen Elizabeth Hall]

Michael Pearce wove eloquent lines through the two wonderful arias with choral interjections... INDEPENDENT

RIHM: DIES [Royal Festival Hall]

The baritone's first entry... was wonderfully accomplished by Michael Pearce, who also brought it to a quiet close with an incandescent solo.
INDEPENDENT

WALTON: BELSHAZZAR'S FEAST [RTE televised Prom, Dublin]

Baritone Michael Pearce was the magnificently clarion-toned narrator.
EVENING PRESS

VERDI: REQUIEM [Brighton Pavilion]

Bass-baritone Michael Pearce was a wrathful God you would never ever dare challenge. His voice is full of majesty and authority, and he sings with piercingly accurate diction.
EVENING ARGUS

VAUGHAN WILLIAMS: SEA SYMPHONY [Snape Maltings]

Anna Leese and Michael Pearce were the excellent soloists, ever alive to the demands of the music's changing moods. …. Pearce especially sensitive in On the Beach at Night Alone.    
EAST ANGLIAN DAILY TIMES

HAYDN: THE CREATION  [Ross on Wye]

Michael Pearce brought a richness and power to his perfor­mance which again enriched both the beauty and humour of the text. Who will forget Michael's vivid depiction of the phrase "In long dimen­sion creeps, with sinuous trace, the worm.” ROSS GAZETTE
EAST ANGLIAN DAILY TIMES

WIGMORE HALL RECITAL

Winning the GKN English Song Award gave the baritone Michael Pearce a Wigmore Hall opportunity which he seized with considerable flair. His bold programme... was delivered with a full-bodied yet surprisingly agile tone.
TIMES

Mr Pearce... opened with cultured performances of Lawes, Blow, Eccles and Purcell, including Eccles’ most charming “The jolly, jolly breeze” which was thrown off with infectious joie de vivre.
TELEGRAPH

Michael Pearce... has a full baritone voice, firm and easy at the top, and his diction is diamond clear.
MUSIC & MUSICIANS

Michael Pearce... revealed a rich baritone voice, even throughout its compass. He lightened it nicely in Vaughan Williams’ “The Roadside Fire”, and Ireland’s “All in a garden green” was exemplary.
SUNDAY TIMES

NYMAN: THE MAN WHO MISTOOK HIS WIFE FOR A HAT [Music Theatre Wales]

Michael Pearce as Dr. P was the firm centre of the production. He sang so superb an account of "Ich grolle nicht" that one would gladly have stayed behind to hear him sing the other 15 numbers of "Dichterliebe".
OPERA MAGAZINE

Michael Pearce... is in his element, painting a clever portrait of assumed normality masking deep-seated anxiety, and turning in a magnificent rendering of Schumann's "Ich grolle nicht" as centrepiece.
INDEPENDENT

HANDEL: AGRIPPINA [Midsummer Opera]

Emperor Claudius... was given stature and sonority by Michael Pearce...
OPERA MAGAZINE

I PAGLIACCI [Pimlico Opera]

Pearce's Tonio, grizzled and crippled....was a powerfully warped figure, with plenty of vocal strength.
GUARDIAN

The richer baritone voice of Tonio (Michael Pearce) was one of the few singers comfortable with the emotional demands of verismo and the range of his part which was well within his vocal grasp.
OPERA NOW

WEBER: EURYANTHE [New Sussex Opera]

Pearce's Lysiart alone exuded baleful confidence and stylistic assurance.
TIMES

Pearce's full, rich tones and subtle acting make him a most watchable villain.
STAGE

The only principal with a voice of suitable sap and colour for Romantic opera was the baritone Michael Pearce as the villain Lysiart. Mr. Pearce made much of Lysiart’s splendid scena at the opening of Act 2. OPERA